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Crusader Kings 3 Guide by gamepressure.com

Crusader Kings 3 Guide

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Crusader Kings 3: Titles Crusader Kings 3 guide, tips

On this page of the Crusader Kings 3 guide, you will find a description of the title system, which forms the core of the gameplay.

Titles are a certificate of land ownership in Crusader Kings 3. Each piece of land in the game has its own title. For example, the land of Krakow is assigned the Count of Krakow. A character, who wants to rule a given area, must therefore have an appropriate title, in this case, the Count of Krakow. For this reason, titles play a major role in the game. Collecting them will be essential for the expansion of your empire, but they may as well be the cause of its collapse. For the titles of different lands, you will conduct wars and plan intrigues.

On this page, we will explain the titles in detail. You will learn what the titles are, what their hierarchy and types are, and how to get new titles. Finally, we will describe the title management.

What are titles?

As already mentioned, titles are to define land ownership. They are also an indicator of your rank and importance in a feudal society. Each of the titles is assigned to a specific land - therefore, to take over a given area, you have to obtain the appropriate title.

The titles you currently have can be checked in the character window (1) - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

The titles you currently have can be checked in the character window (1). If you click on the Titles tab (2), the lower part of the window (3) will display a detailed list of all the titles you have.

Each title is represented by a unique coat of arms - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

Each title is represented by a unique coat of arms. If you click on any of the coats of arms, you will see a window on the left with detailed information about it. If you are its owner, you will be able to change its name (1) and thus the name of the associated lands. Here you can also learn who currently has claims to this title (2) and who had it before (3). At the bottom of the window (4), you will find information about the current title holder, the successors, and the line of succession. If you own the title, you will also be able to destroy it (5) and modify the law of succession (6).

Every character with titles also has the Primary title - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

Every character with titles also has the Primary title. It is always the highest-rank title of a given character, and it determines how their lands are visible on the map. If you have several titles of the same importance, you can decide which one will be your Primary title (right-click on the appropriate coat of arms). For example, if you are the King of Poland and Lithuania and your Primary title is the King of Poland, your lands will be marked on the map as Poland. If you decide to change your title to King of Lithuania, all your territories will be marked as Lithuania. Each character's Primary title is always shown as the largest coat of arms in their character window. If you lose your Primary title, it will automatically be replaced by the next highest title you have. You cannot destroy the Primary title.

Hierarchy and types of titles

All titles are hierarchical and are determined by the feudal order.

At the very bottom of the ladder there are people who do not have any title - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

At the very bottom of the ladder there are people who do not have any title. They may be lowborn people who have never held a title or fallen rulers who have lost theirs. Such characters are unplayable but can perform many significant functions in your court.

The feudal ladder in a nutshell - follow the yellow lines: the Baron answers to the Count, the Count to the Duke, and the Duke to the King/Emperor. - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide
The feudal ladder in a nutshell - follow the yellow lines: the Baron answers to the Count, the Count to the Duke, and the Duke to the King/Emperor.

The lowest rank is Baron or Baroness. Its corresponding territory is the barony, which is also the smallest territorial unit in the game. Baronies are individual cities, castles and churches. The names also adjusted to this division so the lord of the castle is a Baron, the lord of the city is the Mayor, and the ruler of the church land is the Bishop. However, to simplify the terminology, we will be calling all characters with the title of these rank - Barons. Barons are unplayable, and this title can be held by low-born people who do not belong to any noble families. If such a character obtains a higher rank at some stage of the game, they will automatically create a new dynasty and become a playable character.

A group of baronies makes up counties - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

A group of baronies makes up counties. The Count title is the lowest rank of title playable characters can have. So if you dream of a medieval equivalent of rags to riches career, you should start playing as a Count. The counties are marked on the map with the smallest coats of arms. If you click on such a coat of arms (1), you will see a county window on the left side. At the top, you will find a few statistics and information on the ruler of the land (2). At this point, it is worth paying attention to three key issues that apply to each county. The control mainly affects how much tax you will receive from a given county. Of course, the lower the control your administration has over a given territory, the lower the income you will receive from it for your treasury. The control always drops when the county is a place of military operations, whether related to war or rebellion. Control also drops when you take over a new county that you did not previously own. Prolonged low control can lead to corruption and hence various penalties can be imposed on the county. As you can see, maintaining a high control over your Counties is crucial. To increase the control, you can order appropriate task to your Marshal (more about the tasks can be found on the council dedicated page) or hand over the County as a fief.

Another important stat of a County is development. It is a measure of the level of technology and infrastructure development in the County. The development stat affects the tax revenue and also the number of troops a County can deploy and maintain. To increase the development, you can assign the appropriate task to your Steward or build specific buildings in the County. The development stat growth also depends on the innovations you have. Once a county reaches development level 10, further growth will be limited by penalties. To increase the maximum development (to which there are no penalties), you need to research: Public Work (max 20), Communal Government (max 35), Urbanization (max 55), Renaissance Thought (max 90). With the help of these innovations, you can also increase the global pace of development of Counties: Currency (10%), Coinage (10%), Banking (10%), Promissory Notes (10%).

The last stat that needs to be discussed is popular opinion. It is mainly related to the religion and culture associated with a given area. If the Count adheres to a different Faith or has a different culture than his subjects, they will not be happy about this. Discontented citizens can merge into hostile factions, and eventually, that can lead to an uprising. The uprisings are usually harmless. However, if you have just taken over a foreign County with different faith or culture, you should be prepared for social unrest.

In the central part of the County window (1), you can find a list of the baronies belonging to it - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

In the central part of the County window (1), you can find a list of the baronies belonging to it. If you click on any of the icons, you will see information in the lower part of the window on the selected barony, and it also will be marked with a white circle on the map. Here (2), you can check what incomes you get from a given barony, both in taxes and soldiers, and what loot you will get if you attack it. The supply limit indicates how many troops the barony can maintain in its area. If there is an army that exceeds the supply limit, it will gradually suffer from insufficient supplies. That means starvation and death of some soldiers.

Below the statistics mentioned above, you will find a button (1) which you can use to increase the level of the selected barony - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

Below the statistics mentioned above, you will find a button (1) which you can use to increase the level of the selected barony. After clicking it, you will see a window (2) with detailed information on what requirements you need to meet and what benefits you will receive at the next level. At the bottom of the window, there are slots (3) for buildings that you can build in the chosen barony (more about buildings can be found on a separate page). If the barony belongs to you or one of your vassals, you can also change its name (4). The crown next to the rename icon indicates that it is the capital of the County. Finally, the last, round icon (5) has information on the topography.

The Baron is the Count's vassal, and the Count is the Duke's vassal - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

The Baron is the Count's vassal, and the Count is the Duke's vassal. The Duke title, like the King and Emperor titles, has a more abstract character, because, as you can see, the expansion of your kingdom takes place at the County level. For this reason, it is always worth having several counties under your control, which will be your economic background. The income from such counties is higher than the income from the lands managed by your vassals. Moreover, you can decide on their development yourself. To check what areas belong to a given duchy, kingdom, or empire, just move the mouse over the corresponding coat of arms, which will highlight the corresponding territory.

In general, the hierarchy of titles is as follows:

  1. Barony
  2. County
  3. Duchy
  4. Kingdom
  5. Empire

This hierarchy also affects the relationships between the characters in the game. A ruler with a title of a given rank can only be a vassal of another ruler with a higher rank. As a Duke, you can be the liege of a Count or Baron, but you cannot make a King or an Emperor your vassal. Also, your vassal cannot be another character with a title of the same rank as yours (a Duke cannot be another Duke's vassal). Given ranks also benefit from increased prestige or the limit of vassals you can have. Of course, the higher the rank of your title, the greater the benefits you will receive (a detailed list can be found on the Crusader Kings 3 wiki: https://ck3.paradoxwikis.com/Titles)

De jure titles

One of the most important concepts in the game is de jure titles. This term indicates the lands that legally belong to the title. The ownership results mainly from historical conditions. For example, the Duchy of Lesser Poland is de jure part of the Kingdom of Poland.

Information about de jure teritorry can be found in the middle of the preview window of the selected title - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

Information about de jure teritorry can be found in the middle of the preview window of the selected title. In the example above, you can see that, by law, the Duchy of Thessalonika consists of three counties. Another way to check de jure lands is to use the appropriate map modes (more about map modes can be found on the UI page).

De jure titles has a number of consequences - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

De jure titles has a number of consequences. If you have vassals whose titles are not de jure to your titles, then you will receive correspondingly less income from those vassals. At the same time, each such vassal will receive a penalty of -5 to their opinion about you ( Not Rightful Lige modifier).

De jure also affects your ability to Create Titles - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

De jure also affects your ability to Create Titles. To create a Duke or King title, you must have at least 51% of its de jure titles. For Emperor titles, it has to be 81%.

An example of assimilation in which dynastic fragmentation led to the creation of de jure of two separate kingdoms: Poland and Greater Poland - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

An example of assimilation in which dynastic fragmentation led to the creation of de jure of two separate kingdoms: Poland and Greater Poland.

The de jure borders changes over time. This is an assimilation process and it is very long. It is about changing the de jure association of individual titles. If you have just taken over a county that does not belong de jure to your duchy, it will be assimilated (your new county) if its state remains unchanged for 100 years. In practice, it is rather unlikely - during 100 years, you will likely be King and obtain a higher de jure title to vast territories. However, assimilation works at any level of the title hierarchy, so it is also possible to assimilate Duke and even King titles, which is possible if your empire is stable for a long time. The assimilation counter starts running when the given title is taken over. If, however, you lose this title during the assimilation period, the counter will run the other way at double speed. Suppose you assimilated the title of Count of Moscow for five years. In the fifth year, there was a rebellion, and it took you three years to suppress it. Unfortunately, this means that you will have to repeat the entire assimilation process from the beginning. You can also speed up the assimilation of a title by assigning an Integrate Title task to your Chancellor.

Claiming and obtaining new titles

For obtaining new titles, you would need claims - the rights to hold a title that someone else currently owns. There are different types of claims, and they can be obtained and used in various ways.

You can check the claims of a given ruler in their character tab - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

You can check the claims of a given ruler in their character tab. They are located under the list of titles (1), and after clicking the Claims button, the lower part of the character window (2) will show a detailed list of all claims. Here you can check the types of claims and the current holder of the title they are associated with.

There are two main types of claims:

  1. pressed claim;
  2. unpressed claim;

The first type (pressed claim) involves claims that you made or have a strong legal foundation. These are, for example, claims of children to their parents' titles if they have not inherited them, or claims to lands that you have lost as a result of a war. These types of claims are inherited by your primary heir.

The second type (unpressed claim) covers all other cases, and they can't be inherited. It means that these type of claims expires with the death of the person who owns them. An example of such are fabricated claims.

It is possible to change the type of claim in both directions. To strengthen your claims (change from unpressed to pressed), you have to declare war over them. If it ends in White Peace, the claims will change to pressed and become hereditary. It is also possible to change the claims from pressed to unpressed. This is the case with inheriting claims that change to unpressed type when being passed to your heir.

You can also view the claims in a given title's window - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

You can also view the claims in a given title's window. By clicking on the Claimants button, you will see a list of all people who have claims to the title on the right side.

You can obtain claims in several ways - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

You can obtain claims in several ways. We've already mentioned inheritance and fabrication, which involve assigning the appropriate task to your Court Chaplainiest. If you are the head of your dynasty (more on this in the chapter on dynasty management), you can claim the titles held by your kins. To do this, select the dialog box with the chosen character and check out the diplomacy category. Claim Title option will cost you Renown, and Request Claim will require Faith and approval from your religious leader. It is also possible to buy claims for Faith, but it is only available to characters who have the Sanctioned Loopholes skill from the science tree (the second tree - Scholarship Focus - the last but one position).

The claims you have collected will be mainly used to expand your influence and gain new titles - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

The claims you have collected will be mainly used to expand your influence and gain new titles. They are the casus belli for declaring wars over other ruler's titles. If you win such a war, you will get the title, and the previous owner will be left with strong claims to the lost territories. Remember that you can also declare war on someone else's behalf. If any of your vassals, courtiers, or even guests have a title claim, you can raise arms on their behalf. However, winning a war will result in the title will be given to the claimant and not to you, so always pay attention to whether you are acting on your behalf or someone else. It is also possible to use de jure land claims as a case, but this requires appropriate innovation:

  1. Casus Belli from Tribal-era for De Jure County;
  2. Chronicle Writing from the Early Medieval-era for De Jure Duchy;
  3. Rightful Ownership from ate Medieval-era for the remaining de jure titles;

Claims are not the only casus belli for wars over other people's titles. If you are interested in the title of a ruler of different Faith, and at the same time they are perceived as a religious enemy, you can declare a Holy War. The Crusades or Jihads are examples of such conflicts. You can read more about available casus belli in the chapter on war in our guide.

While war is one of the main ways to gain new titles, it is not always necessary to use such drastic methods - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

While war is one of the main ways to gain new titles, it is not always necessary to use such drastic methods. If you are interested in the title your vassal has, you can simply take it from him. To do this, open the vassal dialog windowe and select the Revoke Title (1) option. On the left side, you will see the Revoke Title menu. At the top, you will find a list of titles (2) you can take over from your vassal. Below, there are two tabs (3 - on Accept and on Decline) that allow you to view the consequences of when the vassal accepts or refuses. If you have Hooks for this particular vassal, you can also use them here (4). In practice, the decision to revoke the title will ruin your relationship with your vassal and will often lead to outright rebellion. You can ease the situation by having claims to the title you are revoking - otherwise, doing it will be perceived as tyranny and will worsen your relations with all your vassals. So, revoking titles is an action to use as a last resort and in a situation where you know what you are doing (you are risking a civil war). The option to revoke titles is only available if you have at least the second level of Crown Authority.

Another way to gain new titles is usurpation - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

Another way to gain new titles is usurpation. To usurp the title of another character, you have to own most of the de jure lands associated with that title. The requirements here are similar to those you need to meet when creating new titles - the only difference is that, in this case, you are assigning an existing title to your character.

Finally, it is worth mentioning that you can also inherit new titles. Thus, it is possible to lead to dynastic marriages in such a way as to acquire new lands or claims to them.

Title management

As you can see, there are many ways to earn new titles. However, it is also important not to have too many of them at a given moment.

The Count and Duke can control, directly or through their vassals, no more than 30 counties - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

The Count and Duke can control, directly or through their vassals, no more than 30 counties. Any county above this limit will cause a 10% penalty on gold received. Similarly, the King and Emperor can have a maximum of 2 duchies, and exceeding this limit will lower the opinion of vassals by 15. It is also possible to exceed the Domain Limit, i.e. counties and baronies under your control. In that case, your new properties (exceeding the Domain Limit) will not give you any profit, and each of them will add -10 to all vassals' opinions. You can check the Domain Limit in the top right corner of the screen, and it depends on the rank of your main title, the character's Stewardship skill, and the innovations unlocked.

As you can see, it is worth getting rid of redundant titles in some cases - Crusader Kings 3: Titles - Kingdom management - Crusader Kings 3 Guide

As you can see, it is worth getting rid of redundant titles in some cases. In the case of titles with a rank higher than the county, you can destroy them, but it is always worth considering whether they can be used in any other way. We recommend destroying titles only if you have several titles of the same rank - in that case, giving one of them a different character will make them independent, and you will lose some of your lands. Otherwise, you can give redundant titles to your subjects. To do this, open the dialogue window with the character and select the Grant Titles (1) option. On the left side of the screen, you will see a familiar menu with a list of titles (2) you can grant.

This is perhaps one of the most effective ways to improve relationships with other characters. It is an excellent political instrument, but it carries some risks. As we've mentioned before, granting a title with a rank of your main title means granting the vassal independence. In addition, there is a risk that you will empower one of your vassals too much. Remember that granting title to a given character improves your relationship only with that character. In the next generation, the benefits will disappear, and it may be that one of your subjects will become more powerful than you and not very pleased with your ruling.

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